COINS

COINS is a global company with over 50,000 users and with more than 20 years of experience. COINS provides market-leading industry software solutions to the construction, engineering, service and property sectors. 31% of the UK’s top 100 construction companies use COINS.

Construction e-trading exchange

COINS-etc is the leading e-trading exchange for the construction sector. It brings buyers and suppliers together into an online trading community to drive effective, efficient and fully automated purchase-to-pay processes. COINS’ blue chip customer base and Science Warehouse’s class-leading e-catalogue technology delivers a powerful combination for the construction industry.

Users include leading contractors such as Laing O’Rourke, Bovis Lend Lease, May Gurney, NG Bailey and Trant as well as their suppliers. The latter include Arnold Laver, Burdens, Eugene Harrington, Greenhams, Hilti, KEM Edwards, OfficeTeam and Parker Merchanting to name a few.

Participating organisations benefit from efficient and accurate purchasing, driven by a dynamic catalogue management solution which contains accurate and rich content, up-to-date and customer-specific product and pricing information.

Catalogue management – the key to successful P2P


In selecting an e-catalogue provider it was important for COINS to find a technology partner that could meet the exacting demands of its active and growing customer base in the construction sector.

Derek Leaver, Chief Executive of COINS, said: "COINS’ market research identified Science Warehouse as the best-in-class provider of advanced catalogue management capability.”

Further information is available via the links below:

Read: Bovis Lend Lease: Improving Procurement Efficiency

View: COINS eCatalogue Centre webpage

Watch: COINS eCatalogue video

 

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